Gallery > Canada

A snow storm sweeps across the Tombstone Range. Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon. (35mm film)
Alder and willow typically colonise floodplain deposits that are permafrost free. Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon. (5x4inch film)
Autumn colours. Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon.
The Tombstone Range is formed by syenite to quartz diorite intrusions. The intrusive rocks are frost-fractured along vertical rocks, resulting in sheer cirque walls and blocky scree. Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon. (5x4inch film)
Tombstone Mountain is within the western portion of the Mackenzie Mountains ecoregion, one of the largest and most diverse of the Yukon's ecoregions. (5x4inch film)
Gibraltar Rock. Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park, British Columbia. (6x9cm film)
White-tailed ptarmigans. Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon. (35mm film)
Autumn colours along the North Klondike River Drainage. During autumn when anthocyanins (water soluble vacuolar pigments within plants) are not masked by chlorophyll, plants endure cold better than greener ones. Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon. (35mm film)
Salmon Glacier, Northern British Columbia. (35mm film)
Mt Tombstone. Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon. (35mm film)
Sunwapta River. Jasper National Park, Alberta.
Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia. (6x9cm film)
Sunwapta River. Jasper National Park, Alberta.
Peaks of the Ogilvie Mountains dusted in snow following a brief storm reveal mountain scale folds and layering. Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon. (5x4inch film)
Final rays of evening light fall across the North Klondike River drainage. Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon. (35mm film)
Mt Monolith casts an ominous presence over Divide Lake, Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon. (5x4inch film)
Scree deposited beneath a mountain pass. Over time the scree is reduced in size via chemical and physical weathering later becoming vegetated by moss and lichen. Ogilvie Mountains, Yukon. (5x4inch film)
Mt Monolith and willow thickets. Tombstone Territorial Park, Yukon. (5x4inch film)
Autumn colours along the North Klondike River drainage. The red pigment found in the leaves and stems of many tundra plants convert incident rays into heat to warm plant tissues. Yukon.	(35mm film)

© Michael Polychronopoulos